Why A Possible Google Attack Against Samsung with an “X” Phone is a Mistake

Google, what is this X phone all about?

[Photo Credit: Mashable]

I’m all for Google trying to be a hardware manufacturer these days. The company has been famously known for its Android OS software and controls the software of every new individual who receives an Android smartphone. Back some few months ago (when I purchased the Galaxy S3, my first Android smartphone), I was told the importance of having a “Gmail” account. Google is in charge of Android OS, and Samsung’s smartphone manufacturing success has not changed this in the slightest. I am proud of Google’s acquisition of Motorola Mobility and its plans to enter the hardware business with smartphones of its own.

With that said, however, I must also state the obvious: Google purchased Motorola Mobility for a reason. In the back of the company’s mind, it must have thought, “it’s about time we enter the hardware business and produce phones. All the major tech giants around us are doing it, so why not us?” This mindset makes sense. Google has always attempted to enter into new fields that have remained untouched. If you have the autonomous, self-driving car in mind here, you would be right. Entering smartphone manufacturing is not far-fetched for a company such as Google whose clout stretches beyond Gmail and Google +.

Some have said in days past that Google’s new phone “could be an attack on Samsung.” Other news writers have drummed up the thought by noting Samsung’s desire to produce smartphones using Samsung’s own “Tizen OS,” an operating system that consumers will have to get used to this year. I applaud Samsung for its efforts: after all, are we not talking about a company that made more money than Apple in 2012’s Q4 ($8.3 billion vs. $8.2 billion), and produces other items such as Ultra HDTV’s and home products (washers, dryers, etc.)? Samsung has accomplished so much as compared to its early days when the company sold produce. When I read about Samsung’s history earlier this week, I could not believe that the company evolved from selling produce to selling the world’s most coveted electronics. Why not produce an OS of its own? This is the only thing missing from the Korean giant’s profile, is it not?

Yet and still, there is room for both Google and Samsung in the realm of the Android OS. Google may be a company growing in its hardware acquisition, but Samsung has been at the business of making smartphones much longer than Google. Google’s hold on Android OS is such that Google smartphones receive updates faster than Samsung smartphones (or LG, HTC, and other Android manufacturers). Despite this unfortunate flaw, however, Samsung smartphones are in hot demand. The Samsung Galaxy S3 has made Samsung’s smartphone line a major success, all within the last seven months – its Galaxy Note 2 a “phablet” hit, with a predicted Samsung Galaxy S4 and Galaxy Note 3 to anticipate this year. The company is not showing signs of slowing down anytime soon. If Google wants to get good at making its smartphones, it will not do so without the aid of Samsung Electronics.

It would be a mistake for Google to aim its hardware campaign at pushing Samsung from under its umbrella. I think Google longs for the idea of itself being the only Android company around; the problem with this, I believe, is that Android has been bigger than Google for a long time. With all the financial investments made into Android OS by its manufacturers, none of them is willing to turn around and walk away from customers who have always loved the Android line. Rather than eliminate all of its competition, Google will have to do what many Android manufacturers have learned – create its own exclusive smartphones and stand out from the crowd. In this regard, I wish Google the best of luck.